25th Anniversary: Seiko Grand Seiko 9F quartz caliber

In 1988, the Grand Seiko team made a new quartz caliber that was worthy of the high standards the brand was – and still is – known for. At that time, rapid advances in quartz technology were being made but most were focused on the addition of new functions. The Grand Seiko team though, decided that they could, and should, go further by focusing on the simple essentials of precision and durability. They decided that to be the “ideal” quartz watch, a new caliber was needed that would be even more precise, more durable and more in keeping with the aesthetics of Grand Seiko. Five years later, in 1993, the first 9F caliber, the 9F83, was completed.

The new caliber delivered advances in every aspects. Its hands were as long as those on every other Grand Seiko watch, the calendar change was instantaneous and the durability and reliability was enhanced. Caliber 9F incorporated key innovations such as a backlash auto-adjust mechanism to eliminate any shuddering of the second hand, a twin pulse control system to deliver increased torque and a unique protective shield to minimize the risk of dust coming into contact with the gear train or stepping motor. Still today, the caliber 9F can lay a strong claim to being the highest performance quartz watch in the world.

The new limited edition pays proud homage to the 1993 design. Its case and bracelet retain the soft contours of the original. There are, however, stylistic enhancements. In line with contemporary taste, the case is slightly larger, the Grand Seiko name is now at the 12 o’clock position and the dial carries a special pattern based on the traditional quartz symbol with, above the six o’clock marker, the 5-pointed star which, symbolises the extraordinary precision rate of +5 to -5 seconds a year.
This commemorative watch is offered in a limited series of 1,500 and will be available from April.

A second limited edition also commemorates the 25th anniversary of the caliber 9F. The case design is a contemporary re-interpretation of the celebrated 44GS from 1967 and showcases the beauty of the finishing on the 9F movement through an exhibition case back. The robust construction is clear to see and the striped pattern of the engraving bears witness to the care taken on the finishing on ever 9F movement, which, albeit hidden behind the case back in every other model, is assembled and finished by hand to the same high standard.
The dial, with its special markings and star symbol, is the same as on the first commemorative edition. The bezel is in gold. It is a limited edition of 600 pieces and will be available in May.

The case of both watches is made from stainless steel with a diameter of 39.1 mm and a water resistance of 10 bar.
Both watches are completed by a stainless steel bracelet.

German Watches for the Austrian Air Force

The german-based watchmaker Hanhart from the southern Black Forest can look back on a long history in the production of aviator chronographs. So it should come to no surprise, that when a structural change within the Army and the re-establishment of the Command of the Austrian Air Forces in 2017 the Command inspired to design a limited edition of aviator watches, Hanhart was chosen as partner in this project.
The Primus Austrian Air Force Pilot Limited Edition combines the virtues of the Austrian Air Force such as precision, endurance and resilience with the principles of Hanhart: reliability, perfect legibility, ease of use and robustness. This chronograph combines the characteristic features of both sides, which are required for a perfect pilot’s chronograph.

The dial is, like in all Hanhart Primus watches, wonderfully distinctive. The bright luminescent numerals and indexes together with the red Hanhart details create a clear contrast to the black basic design of the chronograph and thereby contribute to a superb legibility. The unique fluted bezel with inlaid red marking, the typical “bicompax” dial arrangement and the anodized aluminium red button reflect the typical features of the watch manufacturer. The chronograph provides central hours and minutes, a small seconds at 9 o’clock, a 30-minute counter at 3 o’clock and a date display at 6 o’clock. The chronograph seconds are  counted by the central seconds hand.

The new timepiece from Hanhart is available in three different versions of case and bracelet. The chronograph can be ordered in a normal, a matt sandblasted or a black DLC coated stainless steel case. Despite the size of 44 mm in diameter and 15 mm in height, the flexible lugs provide a comfortable fit on the wrist. The case of the Primus Austrian Air Force Pilot Limited Edition is water resistant up to 10 bar.
Inside works the automatic chronograph movement HAN3809. It works at a frequency of 4 Hz and provides a power reserve of up to 42 hours when fully wound.

The bracelets are available in calfskin, vulcanized rubber and canvas; each comes with a folding clasp made from stainless steel and matching the case.
This chronograph is a limited edition of 100 pieces. Prices start at 2.590€ for the regular stainless steel one and go up to 3.090€ for the DLC coated one.

Girard-Perregaux launches the Laureato Chronograph

Two years after its return to the Girard-Perregaux collections, the Laureato is writing a new chapter in its history, with the introduction of an enriched range of chronographs. In this extension of an eminently sporting chic collection, the Laureato once again demonstrates the strength and relevance of the design of this iconic watch, born in 1975.
This timepiece is designed for daily use. Entirely clad in steel or pink gold, available with two different case sizes and interpreted in three dial colours, the Laureato Chronograph is a versatile watch. Equally at ease in smart or informal attire, it is capable of adapting to every daily circumstance encountered by an elegant man.

The dial, adorned as ever with the “Clou de Paris” hobnail pattern, comes in a choice of silver-toned, black or deep-blue versions. The two counters and small seconds subdial all feature a snailed finish that ensures they stand clearly against the background. They bear simple and slender hands facilitating reading without overloading the dial.
At 6 o’clock you’ll find the small seconds, opposite, at 9 o’clock the 30-minute-counter and at 6 o’clock the 12-hour-counter. At 4.30 you’ll find a date window.

Girard-Perregaux has fitted the emblematic case with a chronograph movement. The Laureato Chronograph is endowed with the powerful identity of all Laureato models. This personality all its own is based on a genetic code that has been driving evolutions in its aesthetic details for the past 43 years, while never distorting its essence. The Laureato is defined by a polished octagonal bezel fitted on an integrated case, meaning with no lugs or loops; as well as by its metal bracelet forming a natural extension of the case and representing an original design element in its own right. The exterior of the Laureato case has evolved to incorporate a crown guard, a curve naturally imposed by the pushers themselves. The latter are octagon-shaped like the bezel, creating protuberances that the Laureato Chronograph incorporates with natural ease.
The stainless steel case is water resistant up to 10 bar, the one made of gold up to 5 bar.

The new Laureato Chronographs are powered by the calibre GP03300-0122/0137/0138 (42 mm) respectively the GP03300-0134/0136/0137 (38 mm). the self-winding mechanical movement drives two counters, small seconds as well as a date display. As well as guaranteeing impeccably accurate timekeeping, the calibre provides a comfortable power reserve of 46 hours and works at a frequency at 4 Hz. Its horological qualities are complemented by exemplary finishing including Gôtes de Genève, chamfering and straight graining. 

The metal bracelet is distinguished by wide satin-brushed H-shaped links as well as domed and polished interlink elements. The interplay of polished and satin-brushed surfaces creates heightened visual interest and enlivens the watch. The Laureato Chronograph can also be bought with a leather bracelet, in this case, Girard-Perregaux also delivers an additional rubber strap.

Chronoswiss Flying Regulator Open Gear

The Regulator was the first stand-alone model in the history of Chronoswiss and in subsequent years, it quickly became the brand’s central motif and standard bearer. It is therefore only logical that the design team pays special attention to the Regulator on its 30th birthday, which is also the 35th anniversary of Chronoswiss itself. Following the 3D dials and skeletonizations of recent years, the manufacturer is now introducing the Flying Regulator Open Gear, a model which provides unexpected insights.

To produce a Regulator, a modification of the movement is necessary. Normally, it is hidden from prying eyes underneath the dial. But in this new version it has not only been made visible but also showcased as a central design element, hence the name “Open Gear”.
Its dial is simultaneously its module board, onto which the train wheel bridges of the skeletonized gears are mounted. These move on four ruby bearings, generating the least possible friction. The train wheel bridges have also been skeletonized and boast carefully angled and polished edges. Six screws keep them reliably in their intended place on the dial. This is how functional design is done.
At 6 o’clock on the dial, the Flying Regulator Open Gear reveals an exciting insight. The dial and the bridge have been skeletonized at the height of the small second so that you can see the second wheel in action. As the associated seconds scale – just like the display at 12 o’clock – floats above the dial on a funnel-like display, the gaze is virtually drawn towards the inner workings and to the seconds wheel, designed to look like a rotary dial.
Super-LumiNova inlays on the hands and indexes ensure best legibility, even in the dark.

Chronoswiss offers the timepiece in four different color combinations: in purist stainless steel with dials in galvanic blue, black or silver, or timeless elegant in a red gold case with a galvanic silver dial.

The Flying Regulator Open Gear is a pure Chronoswiss development – from the design to the dial module.
This watch will only be available as a limited edition.

Clear Design: The New Armin Strom Pure Resonance

Armin Strom is known for maintaining a pared-down approach when it comes to watches. This ensures the brand’s style of watchmaking remains focused on its essence. And with every new model Armin Strom heads further in that direction and the new Pure Resonance is no exception. This version too heads further in said direction, squarely placing emphasis on the watch’s most remarkable feature: the visible dual balances oscillating in resonance.

The goal of the Pure Resonance has not changed: to display the interesting resonant balances while improving overall precision. To this end, the twin seconds flyback mechanism of Caliber ARF15 was removed and replaced with one clear-cut subsidiary seconds subdial. The reason for this can be found in the straightforward approach to the movement: the fewer functions a timepiece must perform, the better it can concentrate on accuracy. In other words, with no superfluous functions the watch con focus fully on precisely providing the time.

The dial now offers just subdials for time displays. Roman numerals dominate the off-center subdial displaying hours and minutes in black and blue with blued steel hands, while a classic railroad track marks the exact minutes. The smaller subdial at 7 o’clock displays seconds using only a baton-styled white hand and a simple track.
The resonators are placed at the left side of the dial. The time displays receive their portioned energy from the lower regulator, while the upper regulator remains in place to create resonance.

This conceptual forthrightness is reflected in the design of the movement: the basic calibre ARF16 showcases the resonant regulators and resonance clutch spring. New bridges are decorated with côtes de Genève. The mechanical movement beats at a frequency of 25,200 vph and provides a power reserve of 48 hours minimum.

The outward design of this new Pure Resonance has been kept also pure. The case has a diameter of 42 mm and comes in rose gold or stainless steel. It is 1.4 mm smaller than the original version, comes with reduced lugs and crown and practically no bezel. The characteristic lip at 6 o’clock remains, therefore it can be customized easily.
The case is water resistant up to 5 atm and comes with a leather bracelet.

New Limited Edition by Raymond Weil: Bob Marley Tango

Watch enthusiasts know Raymond Weil among others for its limited editions in which the Swiss manufacturer honors musical icons. In the recent past fans could gush over a model celebrating the Gibson Les Paul guitar, Buddy Holly, David Bowie and two different Beatles watches. Now Raymond Weil has introduced a new music collaboration, honouring the iconic Reggae legend Bob Marley.
Bob Marley remains one of the 20th century’s most important and influential music icons. Famous for having put reggae on the global map, his lifestyle and music continue to inspire new generations illustrated by the millions of albums sold worldwide. His daughter said about the collaboration: “We are honoured to work with Raymond Weil on the creation of this timepiece that celebrates our father’s legacy and recognizes the artistic contributions of so many great musicians in this unique way,” Cedella Marley said.

The Bob Marley Tango 300, a tribute to the renowned artist was developed and designed by Raymond Weil in collaboration with the “House of Marley”. The manufacturer has chosen ist emblematic tango 300 collection for its versatility and durability, as the canvas for the design of this limited edition. Its 41 mm diameter stainless steel case comes with a black PVD plated bezel and houses a quartz chronograph mechanism. The case back is engraved with the iconic Bob Marley logo.

Punctuated with green hands on the sub-dials and a yellow coated second’s hand, this timepiece takes in the color palette from the Ethiopian national flag. The colours stand out spectacularly against the black dial and the red details on the beveled minute track ring complete the look with a subtle reference to the flag. The dial is textured while the subdials aren’t and therefore contrast with its surroundings. At 3 o’clock you’ll find the running seconds, at 6 o’clock the chronograph counts the hours, at 9 o’clock the minutes. Raymond Weil has placed a small date window between 4 and 5 o’clock and there is our only point of criticism because its background is white and therefore stands really out, disrupting the balance a little.
Hour and minute hands as well as the indexes glow in the dark.

The Bob Marley Tango 300 is a 600 piece limited edition and is completed by a black rubber strap.

Sneak Peek: Vacheron Constantin Overseas Dual Time

Time flies. It’s not long till Christmas and after that the SIHH and Baselworld next spring will be just around the corner. Vacheron Constantin is among the first watch manufacturers giving a sneak peek on what to come. Fans and admirers can look forward to the new Overseas Dual Time. This watch is equipped with an in-house movement, featuring two different time zones.
This watch is dedicated to combine a particularly user-friendly handling with high performance and practicality. The Overseas collection embodies a modern lifestyle resolutely open to the wider world and the new Dual Time joins the adventure equipped with the eponymous function presenting a complication much favoured by globetrotters.

The Overseas Dual Time model is designed to ensure reliable, pleasant and elegant wear in every circumstances. its new mechanical self-winding movement, the Vacheron Constantin calibre 5110 DT, stems from several years of development and enables simultaneous reading of two timezones by means of coaxial hands. This 234-component movement oscillates at a frequency of 4 Hz and has a comfortable 60-hour power reserve thanks to its twin barrel that also ensures its high regularity and accuracy.
The hours hand indicates the local timezone corresponding to the user’s current location, while the hand tipped with a triangular arrow shows the time in a reference timezone, generally known as “home time”. The Overseas Dual Time features a 12-hour display along with a day/night indication set to home time, and a pointer-type date display, adjusted and secured via a pusher at 4 o’clock and synchronised with local time.
Both time zones are adjustable via the crown. In position one you have the local time, in position two the home time. The translucent lacquered dial is adorned with luminescent gold hands and hour markers as well as a double graduation bearing the minutes and second scales.

The dual time calibre is housed in a 41 mm-diameter steel case which is water-resistant to 150 metres. The new Overseas model continues a tradition of elegant, relaxed watches designed to offer their owners a combination of comfort and user friendliness. The bezel is evoking Vacheron Constantin’s famous Maltese cross emblem.
There will be three different versions: two in a stainless steel case with a blue or argenté coloured dial, one in a pink gold case, also with an argenté coloured dial.
Presented on a stainless steel bracelet with half Maltese cross-shaped polished and satin-brushed links, the Overseas Dual Time is delivered with two additional straps matching the shade of the dial

Retro: The Hamilton Ventura 60th Anniversary Edition

This year, Hamilton celebrates the 60th anniversary of the Ventura. It’s the perfect opportunity to woo us with an anniversary edition, containing no less than three interpretations of the classic wristwatch.
The original Ventura was introduced in 1957 and with its extravagant looks it found fans fast. Like the King of Rock’n’Roll for example, who wore a Ventura in his movie “Blue Hawaii”. But the Ventura was not only beautiful, moreover it was the first watch powered by a then revolutionary electric caliber.

The new Ventura Class and the Ventura Elvis Skeleton are the backbone of the new remarkable trio by capturing the unconventional case design of its predecessor. The dials of the Ventura Classic with their large symbol for electricity remind of the pioneering feat, the world’s first electric wristwatch achieved.
Within this trilogy past and present join up in the form of a celebration watch with yellow gold PVD stainless steel case. In an additional flash of acknowledgement to Ventura’s illustrious past, a brown lizard-patterned leather strap, white dial with golden hour markers and hands and flash of red at the tip of the second hand provide an unmistakable touch of vintage elegance.

For the next version Hamilton has opted for a jeans design. Not only the strap is made from this fabric but the dial wears a 3D printed jeans-pattern.
The third Ventura comes with an unconventional skeletonized dial which is meant to remind of Elvis’s microphone. The cut-outs provide an insight into the automatic movement beneath. For this watch the customer can choose between a stainless steel bracelet or a caoutchouc one.

All cases come with a charming retro look – although the one of the Hamilton Ventura Elvis Skeleton is a little more modern – and are water resistant up to 5 bar. The Elvis Ventura measures 42.5 x 44.6 mm, the other two versions come in two different sizes: 24 x 36.5 mm or 32.3 x 50.3 mm.

Whether past, present or future – every version of the Ventura honors the heritage of the collection as well as Hamilton’s American spirit. These watches will make sure that this legendary watch won’t be forgotten in the decades to come.

H. Moser & Cie. Pioneer Perpetual Calendar in Steel

H. Moser & Cie. is a small, independent Swiss watchmaker, only producing about 1,200 watches every year. Many of you will possibly know H. Moser & Cie. because of its watches featuring a perpetual calendar.
The Pioneer Perpetual Calendar was first introduced by Moser in 2015, first only in a pink gold version. Now the manufacturer has presented a version in steel with a striking midnight-blue dial. But this is not the first perpetual calendar watch H. Moser & Cie. produced in a steel version – this would be the Perpetual Calendar Concept Funky Blue Dial. With the new Pioneer Perpetual Calendar there’s once more a deep-blue dial, but in this watch the case is bolder.

The Pioneer Perpetual Calendar in Steel features a magnificent midnight-blue fumé dial. The luminescent dots on the flange and the hands filled with Super-LumiNova allow the display to be read at any time of the day.
Many manufacturers lean on complicated dials for watches featuring a perpetual calendar – H. Moser & Cie. does nothing of that sort. The dial is simple, clean and absolutely easy to read. With this decision Moser stays true to its philosophy and the previous models of this watch.
The perpetual calendar consists of two different displays. At 3 o’clock you will find a normal date window. And then there’s a small central hand which indicates the months. 1 o’clock symbolises January, 2 o’clock February and so on. The leap year-display is placed on the bottom of the watch, visible through the sapphire case back.
Apart from that you will also find a small second at 6 o’clock as well as a power reserve indicator at 9 o’clock. It is quite important to not lose sight of the latter because it can be a hassle to newly adjust a perpetual calendar. We would recommend to avoid that – and keep the movement wound.

The H. Moser & Cie. Pioneer Perpetual Calendar in steel is powered by the HMC 800 calibre, a hand-wound mechanical movement. It provides a power reserve of at least seven days (or 168 hours), works at a frequency of 18,000 vibrations per hour and features a double barrel.
The movement is housed in a steel case with 42.8mm in diameter and 11.3mm in height. And: with this handsome watch you can also go scuba diving – the case is water-resistant up to 120 metres.
For the strap, H. Moser & Cie. has chosen black alligator leather.

Bolder, suited for everyday-wear and thanks to the steel case a little more affordable – with this watch H. Moser & Cie. created a beautiful timepiece many will want to have in their collection.

TAG Heuer Formula 1 Red Bull Racing Team

TAG Heuer launched two special series in honour of the famously unconventional Formula 1 team Red Bull Racing. Back in December 2015 TAG Heuer became the Official Timekeeper & Official Watch of the Formula 1 Red Bull Racing team in a landmark agreement. The two brands announced the new name of the 2016 car “Red Bull Racing – TAG Heuer RB 12”, with the watch manufacturer being included in the team’s official name. It’s the first time a watchmaker has ever been named directly in the official title of an F1 team.
Red Bull Racing has amassed four Double World Champion titles, having won the FIA Constructors’ and Drivers’ titles four years in a row. However, it was Red Bull Racing’s unorthodox approach to the sport and to to entertainment in general wich appealed to TAG Heuer, one which is perfectly in line with the brand’s new marketing strategy.
Now, at the most glamorous of all Formula 1 Grand Prix events (no, there’s no doubt about that) – Monaco – and to celebrate its first year of partnership with the most unconventional team in the Formula 1, TAG Heuer introduced two special series TAG Heuer Formula 1 Red Bull Racing Team watches.

The steel chronograph bears the team’s colours – midnight blue and red – an alliance which naturally alludes to the racing mindset. Adorned with a bezel sporting a tachymeter scale in matte blue aluminium, this piece truly reflects the DNA of the TAG Heuer Formula 1 collection.
Inside works a quartz chronograph movement, the Ronda 5040D with the 1/10 second and hour counter at 6 o’clock, a minute counter at 9 o’clock and the current seconds counter at 3 o’clock. The hands are red, matching the team colours, while complementing the white counters and deep blue case.
The case back is engraved with the legendary black and white chequered flag, a symbol of Formula 1, as well as the Red Bull Racing Team logo. The watch is water resistant up to 200 metres.

The watch is available in two versions, one of which has a steel bracelet in keeping with the brand’s flagship models. But the model is also available with a strap made from technical textile for a sportier look, with red stitching inspired by the seat belts of racing cars.
So there’s nothing much new here and calling a watch two special editions that only vary in terms of the strap is a bit of a stretch we would say. But: Nonetheless, these watches are perfect for people who prefer a bit of colour on their wrists and of course they are high-quality like one would expect from TAG Heuer.