Armin Strom Gravity Equal Force

The new Gravity Equal Force is the newest timepiece from Armin Strom. This watch is not only demonstrating continuous innovation, one of the core principles of the manufacture, but also takes the traditional mainspring barrel and turns it on its head. The Gravity Equal Force also marks the launch of the new System 78 Collection, highlighting innovative watchmaking at a competitive price.

The inspiration behind Gravity Equal Force was a desire to transmit equal force to the balance, thereby increasing the consistency of rate. Building upon the classic stop-works mechanism, Armin Strom developed an ingenious stop-works declutch system that operates inside the mainspring barrell to limit the torque delivered to the balance, providing a smooth delivery. This represents the first time a stop-works declutch mechanism has been added to an automatic winding movement.
Not content with one innovation, Armin Strom found insight in a pocket watch in need of repair, which contained a motor barrel design showing clear advantages over the standard going barrel. So the watchmakers designed a barrel operating in the reverse of a traditional mainspring barrel driving the gong train via the barrel arbor and winding the barrel housing.
All of this is built into the new ASB19 calibre which works at a frequency of 3 Hz and provides a power reserve of up to 72 hours.

The new Gravity Equal Force also differs from previous models with a new off-center dial and slimmer case with a smaller diameter. The highlight of the watch is now the triplet of bridges. Moving to an off-center dial, the Gravity Equal Force is more legible to maximize the user experience.
The 41-mm-case is a first for Armin Strom. It is shaping a new aesthetic that showcases the reduction to the essential while maintaining the essence of the manufacture’s DNA.

Armin Strom equips the Gravity Equal Force with a black alligator leather strap.

SeaQ Revives Tradition of Diver’s Watches Made in Glashütte

Timepieces from Glashütte have long been valued around the world for their high-quality mechanics, elaborate finishes and timeless elegance. Since the 19th century, precise timekeepers from Glashütte have also been used as reliable instruments for navigation and for determining one’s position on land, at sea and in the air.
Based on its rich fund of experience and its historic heritage, Glashütte Original now presents a fifth collection after historic marine chronometers, observation watches, pilot and diver’s watches: the “Spezialist”. It is aimed at the fearless man who actively creates his own life. The premiere model in this new collection is the diver’s watch SeaQ, which unites history and modernity in exemplary fashion. The “Spezimatic Type RP TS 200” developed specifically for sports divers, served as an ideal example and inspiration for the new diver’s watch.

The SeaQ is available in two versions: as the SeaQ in both a limited and an unlimited version, and as the SeaQ Panorama Date with black or blue dial.
Fifty years ago, high quality and complex functionality were already key features of Glashütte-made watches. With its limited edition SeaQ 1969, the manufactory takes up this tradition, citing the historic inscription on the black dial and the number of jewels. “Shockproof” refers to the construction of the diver’s watch, renowned even then for its particularly stable design.
The green hands and the “Old Radium” shade of beige on the Arabic numerals and indexes also derive from the historic predecessors. The engravings on the base plate offer decorative enhancement in the form of the trident maritime symbol, the Glashütte Original Double-G and 20 waves, which symbolize the 20 bar water resistance.

The black dial of the unlimited version of the SeaQ presents Arabic numerals, indexes and hands accentuated with the historic “Old Radium” hue. This version also features an engraved base plate.

The SeaQ Panorama Date features the characteristic big date of Glashütte Original, which is harmoniously positioned at 4 o’clock. The dial – optionally either black or blue with a sunray finish – presents the hands, applied Arabic numerals and indexes in green or white, respectively.

Its water resistance up to 20 bar (approx. 20 metres) makes the SeaQ well equipped for changes in pressure underwater, even at greater depths. The second model, the SeaQ Panorama Date, is even water resistant up to 30 bar and therefore perfectly suitable even for professional divers. This essential water resistance of both models is enhanced by numerous details, such as the screw-down crown, the secured base plate on the SeaQ or the screwed sapphire crystal case back on the SeaQ Panorama Date.

As genuine diver’s watches, all versions feature a unidirectional, counter-clockwise rotating bezel with perceptible click, enabling certain determination of the dive time. The SeaQ convinces with a clear minute-detent and the Super-LumiNova coated triangle marking the dive start time. The ceramic inlay makes the bezel surface exceptionally scratch-resistant.
The SeaQ 1969 and the SeaQ are both powered by the manufactory’s automatic movement Calibre 39-11, which features a power resistance of 40 hours, a stop-second mechanism and a date display at 3 o’clock. Glashütte Original has built it into a stainless steel case, 39.5 mm in diameter.

For the SeaQ Panorama Date, the Glashütte watchmakers have successfully adapted the Calibre 36 to meet the challenges of timekeeping underwater. In the 36-13 version, it beats precise and stable, anchored shock-resistant in a 43.2 mm case and with a remarkable power reserve of 100 hours.

The SeaQ 1969 is available in a limited edition of 69 pieces. It comes with two alternative straps: a rubber one and one made from nylon mesh. The SeaQ and SeaQ Panorama Date is additionally offered with a stainless steel strap.

Corum and the Beauty of Mechanics

In 2013, Corum welcomed a new line to the Admiral family – the Admiral AC-One. Keeping in mind the key design codes of the Admiral collection, the lines of the iconic dodecagonal-shaped case was reworked to become more rounded, and angles less prominent. And titanium became the material of choice for this contemporary reinterpretation. Designed as a robust timepiece to complement luxury offshore boating, the Admiral AC-One 45 is even sportier, bolder and pushes the boundaries of creativity a step further.

The AC-One 45 Openwork Automatic introduces a skeletonized dial. The movement is the calibre CO 297, a new calibre, developed by Corum in-house specifically for this model. The bridges visible on the dial side were designed to be in harmony with the dodecagonal-shaped case, as well as the silhouettes of the nautical parents. A sub-dial displaying small seconds is at the 9 o’clock position, while the power reserve indicator sits at 3 o’clock.
Like the AC-One 45 Squelette, which was introduced in 2014, the architecture of the AC-One 45 Openwork Automatic juxtaposes this otherwise rather bulky timepiece with a touch of lightness. But unlike the Squelette which features a completely skeletonized double-date disk, the Openwork Automatic boasts bolder lines and therefore sports a more robust and athletic look.

Corum offers the AC-One 45 Openwork Automatic in two different versions. The first, with a titanium case which adds lightness to the overall design and adds a futuristic vibe. The second version pairs contrasting rose gold with black PVD-coated titanium for a more sporty feel.

And for those of you who are looking for a more complicated mechanism, Corum has prepared the AC-One Openwork Tourbillon. It features a tourbillon at the 6 o’clock position (in addition to all the details mentioned above). Technically sophisticated and beautiful to look at.

All watches feature redesigned straps made from rubber on the surface and synthetic textile on the bottom.

MB&F Horological Machine N°9 Flow

In the post-war years of the late 1940s and 1950s, aerodynamic principles were just beginning to take root in the field of automotive design. Curvilinear forms became more prominent, carrying the immediate promise of power and speed. Thereby, designers were guided by their aesthetic sense. The result were automobiles like the Mercedes-Benz W196 and 1948 Buick Streamliner. Other industries followed, notably that of aviation.
And now, MB&F is presenting the Horological Machine N°9 Flow, which is inspired by the dynamic profiles of automotive and aviation mid-century design.

Reminiscent of a jet engine, a highly complex case in alternating polished and satin finishes encloses an equally complex manual winding movement, developed fully in house. Independent twin balance wheels beat at a leisurely 2.5 Hz on each flank of Horological Machine N°9, visible under elongated domes of sapphire crystal. A Third pane of sapphire crystal on the central body reveals the gearbox of the HM9 engine: a planetary differential that averages the output of both balance wheels to provide on stable reading of the time.
Sitting perpendicular to the rest of the HM9 engine is the dial indicating hours and minutes, driven by conical gears that ensure precise engagement even when motion is put through a 90° planar translation. The winding and setting crown is located on the rear of the central body, its deep fluting providing ergonomic grip as well as aesthetic coherence with the overall design.
Two satin-finished air scoops are mounted alongside the pods containing the oscillating balance wheels, evoking the raised vents that allow continuous airflow to high-performance motor engines.

HM9 Flow treads the path first opened by the HM4 Thunderbolt and subsequently by the HM6 Space Pirate, utilising a geometrically complex combination of milled case elements in both sapphire crystal and metal (titanium and red gold). However, HM9 goes beyond its predecessors, redefining what was thought to be possible in case design – illustrated for example by a three-dimensional gasket ensuring water resistance.

Quite naturally, HM9 Flow was therefore declined in two versions, drawing their inspiration from the two main sources: A “Road” version with a speedometer-style dial; an “Air” version with an aviator-style dial.
Both versions are limited to 18 pieces each.

Two New Panerai Submersible 42 mm Watches

Panerai’s collection of professional diving watches is enhanced by two models in stainless steel, with an applied ceramic disc on the rotating bezel which gives these creations a sporty look, powerful and contemporary, suitable for any wrist since the case diameter is just 42 mm.

Strong, functional and tough are the new watches immediately recognisable Panerai as personalities. Both models have an AISI 316L stainless steel case, with the iconic device protecting the winding crown and the unidirectional rotating bezel for displaying the duration of the dive, and they are water-resistant to a depth of 300 metres (30 bar).

The difference between the two new Panerai Submersibles lies in their colour schemes. In the first the dial, the ceramic disc on the rotating bezel and the rubber strap are all black, with luminous white markers clearly legible under all lightning conditions and in complete darkness; the second stylishly combines a blue ceramic disc surrounding the dial and a blue rubber strap with a distinctively textured shark grey dial. In both models the small seconds hand, essential for checking that the watch is running during a dive, is Panerai blue and rotates in the subsidiary dial at 9 o’clock, symmetrical with the date at 3 o’clock.

Two neu Panerai Submersibles in cases 42 mm diameter – an impressive size, consistent with the Panerai DNA, but suitable for any wrist – express all the power and personality of the professional diving watches made by Panerai, which for many years supplied precision to the commandos of the Italian Navy.

The two new Panerai Submersibles are fitted with the OP XXXIV Manufacture calibre, an automatic movement with a power reserve of three days, the basic standard of the House’s movements. The calibre operates with 28,800 vibrations per hour and is responsible for displaying hours, minutes, small seconds and the date.

As well as the rubber strap, these Panerai Submersible watches are supplied with a spare strap of high-tech material, tough and water-resistant.

For Men and Women: The New Tonda 1950 Lune

Two years after it first appeared, Parmigiani Fleurier is updating the aesthetic of the Tonda 1950 Lune with a model featuring a slate dial and a second design with round diamonds on the bezel. Both showcase the poetry of the “lunar calendar” complication which illuminates their dial with a new layout. Behind this harmony, it is easy to forget the sheer mechanical complexity required to create an ultra-thin self-winding movement with so many time indications.

With a rose gold case matched with a slate colour dial, this Tonda 1950 Lune is the epitome of the classic elegant watch. The lunar calendar, displaying the two hemispheres, is located at 10 o’clock instead of its previous position at 12 o’clock. This offset layout balances the date at 3 o’clock, the logo at 1 o’clock, and the small seconds window at 6 o’clock. All of the time indications are structured to create a pleasingly harmonious dial.

On the other hand, the Tonda 1950 Lune with diamonds features a rose gold case, a mother of pearl dial, a beautiful complement to the light which plays across the stones – a combination which cannot fail to enthral. Additional touches adorn the piece, such as the moon at 10 o’clock which is set in the middle of a starry sky, and the gold outline around the date window at 4 o’clock. Lastly, the dial has been made smaller to accommodate a slightly broader bezel, allowing larger diamonds to be set within it, offering exceptional sparkle and brilliance, unlike any other.

The Tonda 1950 Lune owes its slender proportions to its calibre, the PF708, a mechanism combining precision and reliability with automatic winding thanks to its platinum micro-rotor. Its elements have been carefully arranged o the main plate to ensure the various time indications are harmoniously displayed. As is standard practice at Parmigiani Fleurier, and one of its hallmarks, it boasts hand-applied finishes and bevelled bridges. Its structure is complemented by “Côtes de Genève” decoration.
The automatic movement works at a frequency of 3 Hz and provides a power reserve of 48 hours.

Parmigiani Fleurier delivers the Tonda 1950 Lune with alligator leather straps – black for the men’s models, red and indigo for the women’s models.

Unleashed: The New Urban Warrior from Corum

The Admiral is one of the pillars of Corum’s heritage. Unveiled in 1960, five short years after the brand’s creation, it embodies the Swiss watchmaker’s idea of maritime-inspired watchmaking. Although it has always been loyal to its artistic fibre, it has never been afraid to set sail for distant shores. This year, it gives its Admiral AC-One 45 Chronograph a facelift so as to modernise the collection while lending it an urban sportiness.

First introduced into the brand stable as the Admiral’s Cup AC-One 45 Chronograph in 2013, the masculine-looking watch has always been a combination of power, elegance and performance with a huge dose of inspiration from the sailing world. The new Admiral AC-One 45 Chronograph retains the essence of its sporty predecessor except for a few minor tweaks. The 60 hour marker at 12 o’clock has been replaced by the Corum key and brand logo, which have been slightly enlarged. That decision makes the dial less busy and crowded and therefore the chronograph looks sleeker and more contemporary.
For the chronograph display, Corum stuck to the same tri-compax arrangement. But the dial now features a “Grenadier fendu” motif, which is a unique pattern. And instead of monochromatic dials as with the predecessor, The Admiral AC-One 45 Chronograph comes with black or white dials with contrasting sub-dials. On the former are white sub-dials framed by either white or rose gold rings, while the latter features black sub-dials encircled with white or rose gold rings.

Corum also reworked the case shape of the Admiral AC-One 45 Chronograph. While it follows strictly the case shape of the legendary Admiral watch, there is a marked difference – the new version features a more angular dodecagonal bezel compared to its predecessor, which boasted more rounded corners. For the new variant, Corum has also included two titanium inserts between the bezel and case so as to offer the option of playing with colours and materials – the possibility of mixing and matching is boundless and something that might be experimented with in the future.
The result lends a more powerful and athletic presence on the wrist, which also makes the watch highly suitable for the rigors of every day wear.

Powering the chronograph is the highly reliable CO 132, a self-winding movement that beats at 4 Hz and boasts 42 hours of power reserve.

While the previous versions were offered with either a rubber strap or metal bracelet, the new Admiral comes with a vulcanised rubber strap. But Corum offers the watch also with either a titanium or rose gold bracelet.

Into the Mariana Trench with Omega

When Victor Vescovo piloted his submarine „Limiting Factor“ to the bottom of the Mariana Trench at the beginning of this year, he set a new world record with a diving depth of 10,928 metres. Three Omega Seamaster Planet Ocean Ultra Deep Professional watches were along for the ride: Two attached to a submersible’s robotic arm, another to a Lander.

And who could be better suited to accompany a journey into the abyss than Omega, as the brand’s watches have joined divers and adventurers in dangerous depths for decades. In 1932 the „Marine“ was born – the first diver’s watch for everyone. This watch was used by the researcher Charles W. Beebe when he dared his 14-mile dive. 
1948 the Omega Seamaster was introduced, valued by British pilots and sailors for its water-resistance and absolute reliability. The Seamaster 300 from 1957 was designed specifically for divers and underwater workers. 
The Omega „Ploprof“ was created in 1970 and has accompanied Jacques-Yves Cousteau on his dives. Only one year later followed the Seamaster 1000, one year after that the Seamaster 120 Big Blue. In 1993 Omega launched the popular Seamaster Diver 300M. 
The year 2005 then saw the beginnings of the Ultra Deep, which we present here today.

For Omega, the development of the Seamaster Planet Ocean Ultra Deep Professional started from scratch and included some risks. A watch doesn’t have to be enormous to withstand extreme pressures. The manufacturer managed to limit the thickness of the diver’s watch to less than 28 millimetres without sacrificing its exceptional resistance. The bezel, case, caseback and crown were machined cutoffs from the hull. The Seamaster Planet Ocean Ultra Deep Professional also comes with a viewport. The loadbearing surface of the Limiting Factor’s viewports has been engineered to minimise pressure on the inside edges of the cone, where the stresses are highest. 
Fully integrated into the titanium case, the lugs of the Seamaster Planet Ocean Ultra Deep Professional are left open to lower the risk of exceeding material limitations at full ocean depth, as both the watch and the strap can be subjected to high traction loads. They are called “Manta” lugs due to their distinctive look.

The maximum pressure selected was within the tolerances required in the Mariana Trench, but to be safe and meet the standards for diving watches, Omega insisted on adding a 25% safety margin, which meant that the watches had to work up to 1500 bar. And as if that wasn’t enough, the three watches were subjected to METAS rigorous testing for ten days after returning from their dive. Even after the strains in the depths of the Mariana Trench, the Seamaster Planet Ocean Ultra Deep passed all the tests and received the Master Chronometer certificate.

The expedition logo is located in the centre of the caseback, inside concentric circles evoking the Multi Beam sonar technology. Information such as model, reference number, certification and „tested to 15,000m 49212ft“ can also be found.

Omega’s choice of strap material drew on the brand’s experience in space: The combination of polyamide bracelet and Velcro closure is closely associated with the straps used in the Apollo missions.

Bell & Ross: BR 03-92 Diver Black Matte

When one explores the ocean, when the pressure rises as one navigates its depths, when an instrument’s readability is a matter of survival, Bell & Ross’ diving watches offer a professional, reliable and rugged solution to an environment that is as fascinating as it is dangerous.
Each Bell & Ross watch is designed to match its specific environment. For divers, Bell & Ross has developed tools that are perfectly suited for underwater exploration. They are capable of effectively assisting divers under all circumstances. Legible, functional, accurate, robust and reliable, they meet the specific demands of professionals on the job.

Bell & Ross has a long history of manufacturing watches for the marine realm. And the watch manufacturer’s marine expertise is the result of the collective experience and the knowledge of its designers, master watchmakers and professional users.
The square diving month has become a collection in its own right and now expands to include two new versions. And today we present the BR 03-92 Diver Black Matte.

The matte black ceramic of the BR 03-92 Black Matte is perfectly in tune with the aeronautical codes so crucial to the Bell & Ross philosophy. In the world of aeronautics, and especially space, ceramic is predominantly used in manufacturing parts that are subjected to very high temperatures, acid attacks, corrosion and erosion. Bell & Ross has reworked the high-tech ceramic and developed a special manufacturing process in its workshops. The result is virtually scratch-proof, pleasant to wear, soft to the touch and thermo-regulated. Almost as tough as a diamond, the ceramic is incredibly hardwearing, non-deformable, lighter than steel and hypoallergenic.
The sober design, black dial, large white numerals, shape of the hands and photoluminescent coating allow immediate reading of the time, in broad daylight as well as in darkness. The BR 03-92 Black Matte is powered by the BR-CAL.302, a reliable automatic movement.

The new BR 03-92 Diver Black Mat reaffirms the brand’s functional and utilitarian approach. With a diameter of 42 mm and a water resistance of 300 m, it is the perfect companion on the wrist of any diver.

A New Tourbillon with Perpetual Calendar by Frederique Constant

Following the success of last year’s Perpetual Calendar Tourbillon Manufacture, Frederique Constant now presents two new limited editions of the timepiece. Both versions feature a classic navy blue skeletonized dial and a case in either pink gold or stainless steel.
The occasion for these new watches is the opening of the new Manufacture building in Plan-les-ouates in the Swiss canton of Geneva.

The case of the Frederique Constant Perpetual Calendar Tourbillon Manufacture consists of three parts and measures 42 mm in diameter.
The silver-coloured skeletonized dials are equipped with navy blue sub-dials and an outer ring in the same colour, giving the wearer a deep insight into the complex mechanics.
The watch’s perpetual calendar displays an annual calendar, the day of the week, the date and the month, with a minimum of corrections. The complication takes into account the number of days of each month, displays the year and does not need to be corrected even in leap years. Normally, the Perpetual Calendar would work for 400 years without a manual correction; only due to one exception of the Gregorian calendar, the complication has to be corrected on March 1, 2100.
The hour and minute functions are adjusted via the crown. At 12 o’clock the dial shows the months and leap year, at 3 o’clock the date and at 9 o’clock the days of the week. The tourbillon cage with its integrated second hand, which makes a complete turn every minute, is at 6 o’clock.

The Perpetual Calendar Tourbillon Manufacture is driven by the FC-975 calibre. The automatic manufacture movement was equipped by Frederique Constant with a silicon anchor and escape wheel for greater precision. The use of silicon eliminates the problems caused by the effects of earth gravity when the movement is in a vertical position. In addition, the material is insensitive to temperature fluctuations.
Both versions come with a transparent case back through which the perlage and Geneva stripes of the movement can be admired.

Frederique Constant supplies the Perpetual Calendar Tourbillon Manufacture with an alligator leather strap that resumes the blue colour used in the subsidiary dials and outer ring.