MB&F Horological Machine N°9 Flow

In the post-war years of the late 1940s and 1950s, aerodynamic principles were just beginning to take root in the field of automotive design. Curvilinear forms became more prominent, carrying the immediate promise of power and speed. Thereby, designers were guided by their aesthetic sense. The result were automobiles like the Mercedes-Benz W196 and 1948 Buick Streamliner. Other industries followed, notably that of aviation.
And now, MB&F is presenting the Horological Machine N°9 Flow, which is inspired by the dynamic profiles of automotive and aviation mid-century design.

Reminiscent of a jet engine, a highly complex case in alternating polished and satin finishes encloses an equally complex manual winding movement, developed fully in house. Independent twin balance wheels beat at a leisurely 2.5 Hz on each flank of Horological Machine N°9, visible under elongated domes of sapphire crystal. A Third pane of sapphire crystal on the central body reveals the gearbox of the HM9 engine: a planetary differential that averages the output of both balance wheels to provide on stable reading of the time.
Sitting perpendicular to the rest of the HM9 engine is the dial indicating hours and minutes, driven by conical gears that ensure precise engagement even when motion is put through a 90° planar translation. The winding and setting crown is located on the rear of the central body, its deep fluting providing ergonomic grip as well as aesthetic coherence with the overall design.
Two satin-finished air scoops are mounted alongside the pods containing the oscillating balance wheels, evoking the raised vents that allow continuous airflow to high-performance motor engines.

HM9 Flow treads the path first opened by the HM4 Thunderbolt and subsequently by the HM6 Space Pirate, utilising a geometrically complex combination of milled case elements in both sapphire crystal and metal (titanium and red gold). However, HM9 goes beyond its predecessors, redefining what was thought to be possible in case design – illustrated for example by a three-dimensional gasket ensuring water resistance.

Quite naturally, HM9 Flow was therefore declined in two versions, drawing their inspiration from the two main sources: A “Road” version with a speedometer-style dial; an “Air” version with an aviator-style dial.
Both versions are limited to 18 pieces each.

May We Introduce: Grant – MB&F’s New Machine

MB&F and L’Epée once more joined forces to introduce a new collaboration.Grant is a triple-tracked, Mad-Max-cross-Transformer robot clock on a mission. In today’s fast-paced, always-on, 24/7 world, we are under constant bombardement from time: seconds race by; there is never enough; everyone wants more; and it keeps getting faster and faster. Once, the nearest hour was precise enough – now our clocks are exact to a second. Who feels stressed, can relax: help is at hand, Grant is here.

Grant is a robot with a time display on his shield and a mission to slow things down when time runs too fast. That’s why MB&F has decided to refrain from flashing digital numbers or a constantly spinning second hand. This way, Grant transforms frantic chaos into relaxing hours and minutes, wich is really all, anyone really needs.

While Grant’s time moves relatively slow, he can travel quickly over rough terrain (or the messiest desk) on his three operational rubber tracks. Grant can also transform into one of three different modes: lying horizontally over his chassis for a low profile; crouching at 45 degrees; and sitting up 90 degrees. Grant’s time shield can always be set to a comfortable and optimal viewing angle.

Whatever the angle, Grant’s highly polished clockwork is on full display, and you can follow every click and turn of the gears. The mainspring barrel click near his “belly button” is particularly mesmerizing in operation. The isochronal oscillations of the regulator keeping time in Grant’s glass-domed “brain” are evidence of the clockwork’s high precision. Watching Grant “think” in real time is a stress-relieving activity in itself: Thus, Grant transforms time so that its observer can relax and enjoy it.
Grant’s 8-day, in-line manufacture movement features the same superlative fine finishing as found on the finest wristwatches: Geneva waves, anglage, polishing, sandblasting, plus circular and vertical satin finishing.

Grants Uhrwerk ist auf Hochglanz poliert und aus jedem Blickwinkel vollständig einsehbar, so dass man jedes Einrasten und Drehen der Zahnräder verfolgen kann. Besonders faszinierend ist es, die Sperre des Federhauses in der Nähe von Grants “Bauchnabel” in Aktion zu beobachten. Die isochronon Schwingungen des Gangreglers, der im “Gehirn” unter dem Glashelm die Zeit misst, zeugen von der hohen Präzision des Uhrwerks. Schon, wenn man Grant beim “Denken” in Echtzeit beobachtet, merkt man, wie der Stress abnimmt. Und so verwandelt der Roboter Zeit in solche, die entspannt genossen werden kann.

While he doesn’t look for fights, Grant believes offense is a great form of defense and packs appropriate weaponry. His left arm holds a “you-really-don’t-want-to-mess-with-me” spinning disk, while his right arm clasps a removable grenade launcher. And with the latter, he has a surprise up his sleeve: it is removable and doubles as a winding and time-setting key for his clockwork.
Grant is a lot of things, but small is not one of them. He measures 115 mm in height, 212 mm in width and 231 mm in length in the flat position. In the vertical position, Grant measures 166 mm in height, 212 mm in width and 238 mm in length. The contains 269 components and weighs 2.34 kilograms.

Grant is available in three limited editions of 50 pieces each in Nickel, Black, and Blue.