Corum and the Beauty of Mechanics

In 2013, Corum welcomed a new line to the Admiral family – the Admiral AC-One. Keeping in mind the key design codes of the Admiral collection, the lines of the iconic dodecagonal-shaped case was reworked to become more rounded, and angles less prominent. And titanium became the material of choice for this contemporary reinterpretation. Designed as a robust timepiece to complement luxury offshore boating, the Admiral AC-One 45 is even sportier, bolder and pushes the boundaries of creativity a step further.

The AC-One 45 Openwork Automatic introduces a skeletonized dial. The movement is the calibre CO 297, a new calibre, developed by Corum in-house specifically for this model. The bridges visible on the dial side were designed to be in harmony with the dodecagonal-shaped case, as well as the silhouettes of the nautical parents. A sub-dial displaying small seconds is at the 9 o’clock position, while the power reserve indicator sits at 3 o’clock.
Like the AC-One 45 Squelette, which was introduced in 2014, the architecture of the AC-One 45 Openwork Automatic juxtaposes this otherwise rather bulky timepiece with a touch of lightness. But unlike the Squelette which features a completely skeletonized double-date disk, the Openwork Automatic boasts bolder lines and therefore sports a more robust and athletic look.

Corum offers the AC-One 45 Openwork Automatic in two different versions. The first, with a titanium case which adds lightness to the overall design and adds a futuristic vibe. The second version pairs contrasting rose gold with black PVD-coated titanium for a more sporty feel.

And for those of you who are looking for a more complicated mechanism, Corum has prepared the AC-One Openwork Tourbillon. It features a tourbillon at the 6 o’clock position (in addition to all the details mentioned above). Technically sophisticated and beautiful to look at.

All watches feature redesigned straps made from rubber on the surface and synthetic textile on the bottom.

Louis Erard und Alain Silberstein present two Limited Editions

Louis Erard watches are introducing a reinterpretation of the brand’s regulator watch in collaboration with the architect and watchmaker Alain Silberstein, available in two editions. This is a double first: in its 90 years of existence, Louis Erard has never given a carte blanche to a designer, while Alain Silberstein had never before designed a regulator watch.

While on the surface it may appear fun and light, this limited edition watch has hidden depth. It reflects the strategy of the Louis Erard brand, more focused than ever on its vocation as an independent watchmaker dedicated to excellence in the making of accessible watches.

The watch’s design starts with the mechanics: the brand’s regulator, an exclusive calibre made for Louis Erard. This complication goes back through the history of watchmaking. Traditionally, the principle of the regulator is to separate the indications of the hours, minutes and seconds in order to improve chronometric precision. This is a pillar of Louis Erard’s timepieces, with the regulator at the heart of its collections since the brand’s relaunch in 2003. The regulator remains more than ever at the centre of the brand’s strategy.
For Alain Silberstein, the regulator is also a technical, aesthetic and philosophical essential. For him, the regulator is the centrepiece, a model for the breaking down of time focused on the central minute hand. It is reduced to the most basic form of an indicator: an arrow. It is large and yellow on the black version, and deep blue on the white version. This minute hand points to simple lines. The rest of the dial features the same geometric simplicity: The hour hand is a large red triangle, while the seconds are indicated by a serpentine hand. The colours follow a similar logic, reduced to the basic spectrum of blue, red and yellow, inspired by the Bauhaus movement. This way, the watches pay tribute to the birthplace of modern design.

All models are powered by an automatic calibre, the ETA Peseux 7001, which is equipped with the Louis Erard RE9 complication. It operates at a frequency of 21,900 vibrations per hour and provides a power reserve of up to 42 hours.

Louis Erard and Alain Silberstein have designed the cases to match the dials. They are made either of stainless steel or black PVD coated stainless steel and water resistant up to 5 atm. Depending on the colour, the watches are equipped with a black or brown calfskin strap.
As mentioned, the watches are limited editions with 178 watches each.

Classic with a Retro Twist: Mathieu Legrand Marin

Swiss watch manufacturer Mathieu Legrand is known for its extraordinary range of models and designs, which suit every taste. And today we introduce a crowd favourite from the current collection, a model with clear references to diving watches, but without actually being one. For those who are looking for a watch that doesn’t only look the part but is really up to the challenge, Mathieu Legrand offers the Immergée, which is designed as a serious tool and comes with a water resistance of 20 atm.

The Mathieu Legrand Marin features a classic, sporty and petty masculine design. The indexes are round except for the ones at 6, 9 and 12 o’clock, which are bar-shaped. The date window at 3 o’clock balances the design beautifully. Like the hour, minute and seconds hands, the indices are also equipped with a generous amount of lume, making the watch easily legible, even in the dark. The dial sports various structural details and is protected by a scratch-resistant sapphire crystal.

The stainless steel case features a combination of polished and satin finishes for an appealing look. The classic, slightly curved lugs are pleasantly short, so that the Marin can be comfortably worn also on smaller wrists. The case has a diameter of 42 mm and is waterproof up to 10 atm. As mentioned earlier, the Marin is not a diver’s watch; however with 10 atm, nothing stands in the way of swimming or snorkeling.
Mathieu Legrand has equipped the Marin with a beautifully serrated bezel. It is black in every version but in the blue one; in the latter it matches the dial.

The Mathieu Legrand Marin is powered by a reliable, hard working quartz movement.
The manufacturer has fitted the watches with soft, low-maintenance silicone bracelets. And the large selection of models (we especially love the blue one, but the bright orange one also has a lot of charme) should guarantee a favorite for everyone.

Ulysse Nardin Special Edition for the Monaco Yacht Show

In honor of the most prestigious yacht show in the world, Ulysse Nardin presented a new creation limited to 100 pieces with a Grand Feu enamel dial. It is part of the Marine Torpedo range, which reflects the brand’s maritime and military heritage and its mastery of this time-honoured craft.
This year’s Monaco Yacht Show once again welcomed lovers of magnificent yachts, dream destinations and luxury cruises to Port Hercule. An idyllic setting in which Ulysse Nardin, the main sponsor of the show, presented its latest creation: the Marine Torpillieur Monaco Yacht Show Limited Edition.
Since its very beginnings, Ulysse Nardin has focused its attention on the nautical world, and this partnership is fully in line with the manufacturer’s maritime heritage.

The new Marine Torpilleur Monaco Yacht Show Limited Edition reflects the full savoir-faire of Ulysse Nardin. The watches feature a Grand feu enamel dial. Ulysse Nardin benefits from the unique skills of Donzé Cadrans, who specialise in producing traditional enamel dials. Enamelling on the dial is a historical decoration technique for which there is no official training and which requires a great deal of sensitivity. The term “Grand Feu Enamel” refers to the vitrification of mineral materials. All of this work is carried out by hand and it is not unheard of for the dial to break during the various stages of production, which makes these creations all the more sought after.
For the Monaco Torpedo Marine, a copper base is first dusted with enamel in white and grey and then fired in an oven. In a second step, the indices and inscriptions are applied to the dial, which is then fired again, until the new enamel layer melts with the ensemble.

The dial is fitted a diameter to the case, then the openings of the two added subdials are fit to size. The chamfering and the two subdials is adjusted using a file in order to assemble the parts. The grey dials of the power reserve and the small second are then soldered to the white dial.
The hours are indicated by elongated blue Roman numerals and pear-shaped hands in stainless steel. At six o’clock, on the small seconds subdial, lie the date aperture and the inscriptions “Monaco Yacht Show” and “09.19” in red. The numbers 25, 26, 27 and 28 in red refer to the date of the yacht show.

The Marine Torpilleur Monaco Yacht Show Limited Edition is powered by the UN-118 manufacture movement. This automatic calibre offers a power reserve of 60 hours (displayed at 12 o’clock).

The Torpedo Marine is perfectly adapted to the modern and urban lifestyle and convinces by its wearing comfort as well as by its aesthetics. The screw-down crown bears the engraved Ulysse Nardin logo.
The timepiece features a blue alligator leather strap with white reinforcement.

MB&F Horological Machine N°9 Flow

In the post-war years of the late 1940s and 1950s, aerodynamic principles were just beginning to take root in the field of automotive design. Curvilinear forms became more prominent, carrying the immediate promise of power and speed. Thereby, designers were guided by their aesthetic sense. The result were automobiles like the Mercedes-Benz W196 and 1948 Buick Streamliner. Other industries followed, notably that of aviation.
And now, MB&F is presenting the Horological Machine N°9 Flow, which is inspired by the dynamic profiles of automotive and aviation mid-century design.

Reminiscent of a jet engine, a highly complex case in alternating polished and satin finishes encloses an equally complex manual winding movement, developed fully in house. Independent twin balance wheels beat at a leisurely 2.5 Hz on each flank of Horological Machine N°9, visible under elongated domes of sapphire crystal. A Third pane of sapphire crystal on the central body reveals the gearbox of the HM9 engine: a planetary differential that averages the output of both balance wheels to provide on stable reading of the time.
Sitting perpendicular to the rest of the HM9 engine is the dial indicating hours and minutes, driven by conical gears that ensure precise engagement even when motion is put through a 90° planar translation. The winding and setting crown is located on the rear of the central body, its deep fluting providing ergonomic grip as well as aesthetic coherence with the overall design.
Two satin-finished air scoops are mounted alongside the pods containing the oscillating balance wheels, evoking the raised vents that allow continuous airflow to high-performance motor engines.

HM9 Flow treads the path first opened by the HM4 Thunderbolt and subsequently by the HM6 Space Pirate, utilising a geometrically complex combination of milled case elements in both sapphire crystal and metal (titanium and red gold). However, HM9 goes beyond its predecessors, redefining what was thought to be possible in case design – illustrated for example by a three-dimensional gasket ensuring water resistance.

Quite naturally, HM9 Flow was therefore declined in two versions, drawing their inspiration from the two main sources: A “Road” version with a speedometer-style dial; an “Air” version with an aviator-style dial.
Both versions are limited to 18 pieces each.