New Timezone: Oris Big Crown ProPilot Worldtimer

Oris has a Worldtimer in his collection since 1997. Its design and functions were so popular amongst fans and watch afficionados that Oris hasn’t changed much over the course of these 20 years. But we won’t deny that the name might be a little confusing because classically, this feature would be classified as a second timezone and not as a world time function. It came with a sub dial for the second timezone including a day/night indicator and was easy to read. This original watch featured plus and minus pushers on the side of the case that when pressed adjusted the local time forwards or backwards in one-hour jumps, without the need to pull out the crown or stop the running of the watch. The date would keep track of the time adjustment, even if that meant going backwards over midnight.

In the new Big Crown ProPilot Woldtimer Oris has maintained the original design overall while taking the world time complication to a new level. Basically, this watch has the same functionality as the 1997 innovation, but now the pushers are cone and local time is adjusted by rotating the bezel. Rotating the bezel clockwise moves the central hour hand forward in one-hour jumps; counter clockwise back, also in one-hour jumps.
The design is a little cleaner due to the disappearance of the pushers and the new Worldtimer sports a Big Crown ProPilot case, therefore belonging to Oris’ pilot’s watch collection. It features the signature coin-edged bezel that makes it easy to grip when adjusting local time. The dial measures generous 44.7 mm in diameter and falls somewhere in the middle of the collection which cases range from 41 to 47 mm. The dial is very legible through its size and clean design. Over the dial lies a domed, anti-reflective sapphire crystal.
The case is water resistant up to 10 bar.

Oris offers two versions of the Big Crown ProPilot Worldtimer. The first has an anthracite dial and a polished top ring on the bezel, the second has a black dial and a brushed top ring. The day/night indicator is still there; it is placed in the sub dial for the second timezone, opposite the date window. When the small window is light it is day in the second timezone, at night the window appears dark.
The watch is powered by the Oris Kal. 690, which is based on the ETA 2836-2. It can be seen through the mineral glass in the case back. The calibre features, as mentioned, an adjustable hour hand for local time, a subsidiary second time zone with hour and minute hands as well as a day/night indicator at 3 o’clock, a date window at the same position, and small seconds at 9 o’clock.

The Big Crown ProPilot Worldtimer comes with one of three different straps. The leather and textile strap feature a stageless length adjustment system that’s based on the airplane safety-belt principle. Naturally, there will also be a stainless steel bracelet.
Oris is known for its great price-performance ratio and the new Worldtimer is no exception. The watches with the leather and stainless steel bracelet cost 3.400€, one with a textile bracelet costs 3.200€.

The De Bethune DB28 Kind Of Blue Tourbillon Meteorite

Futuristic designs combined with a tourbillon have become some kind of a specialty of De Bethune. Fans love the distinctive designs and it has to be said that these special creations fit seamlessly with the other models in the collection which offers other spacy wristwatches too.
The newest tourbillon, that answers to such a description is the DB28 Kind of Blue Tourbillon Meteroite, a watch, which is equipped with a dial made from an actual meteorite. May this be the ultimate watch for the space enthusiast?

This watch is not for the faint of heart, just look at the stunning, truly galactic colours. For me, it wasn’t obvious at first sight – the design is just too stunning -, I had to take a second look, but the case of the DB28 Kind Of Blue Tourbillon Meteorite is blue. Of a deep, rich blue to be exact and it doesn’t come from a PVD coating. De Bethune created the colour in the same process that is used to blue screws. And this heat-based technique has basically been applied to every visible piece of metal in this watch. And this makes for one impressive outcome.
The case measures 42.6mm in diameter and 9.7mm in height.

But the dial is undeniably at the centre of attention. It is, after all, made from an actual meteorite which landed about 5,000 years ago in Argentina, in Santiago del Estero. How cool is that? With this watch one wears a piece on the wrist which has traveled through outer space. And the looks the comet brings at the table is truly magnificent. It radiates in blue, violett and little bit of pink and not only complements the colour of the case but also reminds us of nebulas and galaxies. To intensify this marvellous effect, De Bethune has added tiny stars in white gold. It might seem impossible but with all this gorgeousness the big tourbillon at 6 o’clock can nearly be overlooked. And of course the pink gold of the hour and minute hand fits perfectly to the colours of the dial.

The watch is powered by the DB2019v3m a hand-wound nechanical tourbillon movement. The power reserve indicator is located on the back. It can be seen through the sapphire crystal case back as well as the blue movement. The power reserve indicator in pink gold contrasts beautifully with the deep blue.

The De Bethune DB28 Kind Of Blue Tourbillon Meteorite clearly isn’t a watch for everyone – it really can’t be because it is a unique piece. The watch costs 280,000 CHF and will be introduced at next year’s Baselworld.